News

Cancer and COVID-19 webinar series

The Canadian Cancer Society has created a webinar series on COVID-19 and cancer to offer support and information to people with cancer and their caregivers, family and friends. Each webinar is presented by an expert speaker and addresses a central question about managing cancer needs during this time of COVID-19. Topics include:

  • Cancer and COVID-19: Exercise for people with cancer and their families during COVID-19 (Length: 48 minutes)
  • End-of-life and palliative care in the time of COVID-19 (Length: 17 minutes)
  • COVID-19 and cancer treatment (Length: 45 minutes)
  • Cancer and COVID-19: Staying safe (Length: 21 minutes)
  • Coping with cancer and COVID-19 (Length: 25 minutes)
  • COVID-19 and cancer patients (Length: 13 minutes)

For more information and to watch a webinar: https://www.cancer.ca/en/support-and-services/resources/cancer-and-covid19-webinar-series/?region=bc

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Thank you Miskin Law, Insulators Local 95, and BC Building Trades Council!

Miskin Law has stepped up once again with a very generous donation to the Canadian Mesothelioma Foundation.  We are very grateful for Miskin Law's continuing support. 

And thank you to the Insulators Local 95 for their generous donation and whose support we value tremendously and can always count on! 

Thank you to the BC and Yukon Building and Construction Trades Council!

These donations will help us continue to support those affected by mesothelioma. The pandemic has prevented the Canadian Mesothelioma Foundation from holding our usual fundraising events.  This has had a devastating affect on our fundraising efforts. Please consider helping us continue our work. Donate now.  We can't do it without you!  

 

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Breaking News: Johnson & Johnson to End Talc-Based Baby Powder Sales in North America

"The company has faced thousands of lawsuits from cancer patients who claim that its talc was contaminated with asbestos, a known carcinogen, and that the company knew of the risks."

    - By Tiffany Hsu and in the New York Times, May 19th, 2020

In a developing story, the New York Times is reporting that Johnson & Johnson announced today (May 19, 2020) that it is discontinuing North American sales of baby powder made with talc. According to the article, Johnson & Johnson "would wind down sales over the next few months, allowing existing bottles to be sold by retailers until they run out. Baby powder made with cornstarch will remain available, and talc-based baby powder will continue to be sold in other parts of the world."

To read the full article: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/05/19/business/johnson-baby-powder-sales-stopped.html

Johnson & Johnson's consumer announcement can be read in full here: https://www.jnj.com/our-company/johnson-johnson-consumer-health-announces-discontinuation-of-talc-based-johnsons-baby-powder-in-u-s-and-canada

The CMF will continue to monitor this story and will publish updates as they emerge.

Canada completes long road to asbestos ban regulation

Media Release CANADA COMPLETES LONG ROAD TO ASBESTOS BAN REGULATION: Pivotal to halt use in products, stop exposure October 18, 2018 Immediate Release Toronto – The use of asbestos and asbestos containing products will no longer be permitted in Canada as of December 30, 2018 under regulations passed today by the Canadian government. Canada now joins over 55 countries that have banned the use of asbestos. This regulation, supported very widely in Canada, is an essential step to stop asbestos exposure and protect health of workers and the public. “We commend the government of Canada for taking this critically important step to radically reduce future exposure of Canadians, especially workers, to the harms of asbestos,” states Theresa McClenaghan, Executive Director and Counsel, Canadian Environmental Law. “This ban marks a necessary shift in Canada’s history with asbestos use, manufacture, import and export.” The regulation prohibits the import, use, sale, manufacture and export of asbestos and products with asbestos, and outlines permitting and reporting regimes for a narrow range of allowable uses. “Eliminating the use of asbestos provides an opportunity for innovation to find safe alternatives to the use of asbestos, for example brake pads and asbestos cement pipes. This will create jobs in Canada.” states Alec Farquhar, Coordinator, Asbestos Free Canada “The regulation requires accountability and reporting to the public. That’s a good thing! Stockpiles of asbestos and products containing asbestos, for example, are not allowed once the regulation is in place.” There were approximately 530 new cases of mesothelioma in 2011 and 1900 lung cancer due to asbestos.